Tea & Caffeine – What’s the Story?

What is Caffeine?

Caffeine is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves, seeds or fruits of at least 100 different species worldwide and is part of a group of compounds known as methylxanthines. The most commonly known sources of caffeine are coffee, cocoa beans, cola nuts and tea leaves. People have enjoyed caffeinated beverages for many years. Caffeine is also added to specifically formulated ‘energy drinks’ and pharmaceutical products such as cold and flu remedies.


Coffee and tea also contain other dimethylxanthines; theophylline which has similar properties to caffeine and theobromine whose pharmacological actions is far less potent than caffeine and theophylline.

The amount of caffeine present in products depends on the type of the product, the serving size and the preparation method. For example a 190ml cup of tea contains 50mg of caffeine, one third less than the same amount of an instant cup of coffee (75mg). Table 1 below gives an indication of the amount of caffeine found in other drinks compared to tea:

Table 1 – Type of Product Caffeine (mg/ serving)

  • Tea All types 50mg/ 190ml serving (1)
  • Coffee Brewed (filter or percolated) 100-115mg/ 190ml serving (1)
  • Instant 75mg/ 190ml serving 1 Cola drinks Standard and Sugar Free 11-70mg/ 330 ml can (2)
  • ‘Energy’ drinks All types 28-87mg/ 250ml serving (2)
  • Chocolate Bar 5.5-35.5mg/ 50g bar (2)

On average we consume 3.98mg of caffeine /kg body weight per day ie 239mg/ day for a 60kg person (3).

What is a safe intake of caffeine?

Up to 300mg/day (6 cups of tea) is considered moderate, with no evidence of harmful effects in the vast majority of the adult population. Some individuals are sensitive to caffeine and will feel effects at smaller doses than other individuals who are less sensitive. For this reason, these individuals may need to limit their caffeine intake.

Metabolism and Clearance

Caffeine does not accumulate in the body over a course of time and is normally excreted within several hours of consumption. The rate of caffeine elimination varies between individuals and this maybe as a result of genetic factors affecting the enzymes involved in the metabolism, or due to certain lifestyle factors e.g., smoking.

Children also metabolize caffeine at a quicker rate. Generally caffeine absorption is complete within about one hour after ingestion and the plasma concentration peaks (2) after about 60-90 minutes. The half-life of caffeine in the plasma is about 2.5 – 4.5 hours in healthy adults.

Caffeine Tolerance

A number of different factors affect individual tolerance to caffeine, including the amount ingested, the frequency of caffeine consumption and individual metabolism. It is widely recognized that gradual tolerance develops with prolonged caffeine use.

Physiological Effects

Caffeine is a pharmacologically active substance, and depending on the dose, has a number of actions:-

• Central Nervous System Stimulant. A moderate caffeine intake can cause mild stimulation that maybe beneficial in terms of increased alertness, concentration, improved performance and decreased fatigue. (5-10) However, higher intakes may affect sleep, cause nervousness and an irregular heartbeat.

• Weak Bronchodilator. As a result, interest has been shown in its potential role as an asthma treatment. A number of studies have explored the effects of caffeine in asthma and the conclusions from a Cochrane Review suggest that caffeine appears to improve airways function modestly in people with asthma for up to four hours after consumption. (11)

• Diuretic. The diuretic action of caffeine may be due to an increase in renal blood flow, leading to an increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or due to a decreased re-absorption of sodium in the renal tubules. The diuretic effect of caffeine is dependent on the amount consumed and duration of intake e.g. the caffeine in tea does not have a diuretic effect unless the amount of tea consumed at one sitting contains more than 250-300mg of caffeine, equivalent to between 5 and 6 cups of tea. (12-17).

In fact, due to the volume of fluid that is drunk whilst enjoying a cup of tea, the British Dietetic Association advises that tea can contribute towards the daily recommended fluid intake of 1.5 to 2 litres.

• Cardiac Muscle Stimulant. Moderate caffeine consumption does not increase cardiac arrhythmias. (18)

If regular caffeine consumption is stopped abruptly, symptoms such as headaches, irritability and fatigue may occur. These effects are usually temporary, disappearing after a day or so and can be avoided if caffeine cessation is gradual.

Caffeine and Health

The role of caffeine in the development of certain diseases and conditions has been the subject of extensive research in recent years.

Cancer.

A number of studies investigating the impact of caffeine in the development of cancer have failed to establish a relationship. (19-22) In fact, tea is one of the richest sources of flavonoids, a powerful group of antioxidants. The role of antioxidants in the prevention of free radical damage has led to suggestions that tea maybe anti-carcinogenic. (23). Despite interesting preliminary research, further work is required to prove its beneficial effect in this area.

Heart Disease.

The relationship between caffeine and heart disease has been the subject of a number of studies, and results from these and epidemiological studies have led to the conclusion that the ingestion of moderate amounts of caffeine is not associated with any increased risk of heart disease. (24-28) The Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy concluded that ‘there is little evidence that caffeine itself has any relation with CHD risk’ in the 1994 Nutritional Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease report. (29)

Parkinson’s Disease.

Observational studies have suggested that caffeine may play a role in protecting against Parkinson’s disease, (30-31). Further research to try to determine the exact mechanism is required.

Relief of headaches.

In a study of 301 regular headache sufferers, researchers found that a combination of ibuprofen and caffeine was better than either drug alone in relieving pain. (32)

Although a caffeine ‘pill’ was used in this trial, the researchers believed that caffeinated beverages would work just as well. However, they did warn that chronic headache sufferers should avoid caffeine because it might exacerbate symptoms. More work is required in this field before firm conclusions about caffeine and pain relief can be drawn.

Pregnancy

Caffeine crosses the placenta and achieves blood and tissue concentrations in the foetus that are similar to maternal concentrations. For this reason recent advice published by the Food Standards Agency (33) recommends that pregnant women should limit their intake of caffeine consumption to less than 300mg/ day (equivalent to 6 cups of tea/ day). At this level there is little evidence to suggest that the health of the unborn child or mother is affected.

In Summary…

Despite recent publicity about caffeine, the fact remains that the consumption of caffeine at intakes of 300mg/ day has no adverse effects in the vast majority of the adult population. For this reason an average intake of three to four cups of tea (34) a day is well within the level considered safe.

Caffeine and Breastfeeding.

Caffeine enters breast-milk in small amounts (about 1% of the mother’s plasma level) but it does accumulate in smaller babies. Six to eight cups of coffee a day can result in infant wakefulness and hyperactivity. Smoking augments this effect. Of course the dose of caffeine from one cup of tea a day is nothing like the dose from several cups of coffee a day, but it makes sense to keep the dose the baby gets as low as possible.

References:-

1. Gray J (1998). Caffeine, coffee and health. Nutrition and Food Science 6:314- 319

2. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) (1998). Survey of caffeine and other methylxanthines in energy drinks and other caffeine containing products (updated). Food Surveillance Information Sheet No. 144 (No. 103 revised). London

3. Barone JJ, et al. (1996) Caffeine consumption. Food and Chemical Toxicology 34:119-129

4. Graham TE (1997) The possible actions of methylxanthines on various tissues. In Reily T., Orme M (eds). The clinical pharmacology of sports and exercise. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam. 257-270

5. Lieberman HR, et al (1987). The effects of low doses of caffeine on human performance and mood. Psychopharmacology 93:308-312

6. Jarvis M. (1993). Does caffeine intake enhance absolute levels of cognitive performance? Psychopharmacology 110:45-52

7. Hindmarch I, et al. (1998). The effects of black tea and other beverages on aspects of cognition and psychomotor performance. Psychopharmacology 139(3) :230-238

8. Smith AP, et al (1990-91). Effects of caffeine given before and after lunch on sustained attention. Neuropsychobiology 23(3): 160-163

9. Durlach PJ, et al (1998). The effects of a low dose of caffeine on cognitive performance. Psychopharmacology 140(1):116-119

10. Battig K. (1986) Effect of coffee on the speed of subject-paced information processing. Neuropsychobiology;16(2-3):126-30

11. Bara AI, Barley EA. (2001) Caffeine for asthma (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, 2, Oxford

12. Nussberger, J. et al. (1990) Caffeine-induced diuresis and atrial natriuretic peptides. Journal of cardiovascular Pharmacology, 15, 685-691

13. Neuhäuser-Berthold, M. et al. (1997) Coffee consumption and total body water homeostasis as measured by fluid balance and bioelectrical impedance analysis. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 41, 29-36

14. Martof, M.T. and Knox, D.K. (1997) The effect of xanthines on fluid balance. Clinical Nursing Research, 6:186-196

15. Stookey, J.D. (1999) The diuretic effects of alcohol and caffeine and total water intake misclassification. European Journal of Epidemiology, 15, 181-188 16. Passmore AP et al (1987) Renal and cardiovascular effects of caffeine: a dose response study. Clin. Sci. 72(6), 749-56

17. Grandjean AC et al (2000) The effect of caffeinated, non-caffeinated, caloric and non-caloric beverages on hydration. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 19(5), 591-600

18. Myers MG. (1991) Caffeine and cardiac arrhythmias. Annals of Int Med,114:147-150

19. Rosenberg L. (1990). Coffee and tea consumption in relation to the risk of large bowel cancer. A Review of Epidemiological Studies. Cancer Letters 52:163-171

20. Jacobsen BK, et al (1986). Coffee drinking, Mortality and Cancer Incidence: Results from a Norwegian prospective study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 76:823-831

21. Gordis, L (1990). Consumption of methylxanthine-containing beverages and risk of pancreatic cancer. Cancer Letters, 52:1-12

22. Lubin F, et al. (1990) Consumption of methylxanthine-containing beverages and the risk of breast cancer. Cancer Letters, 53:81-90

23. Huang MT, et al (1992). Phenolic compounds in food and cancer prevention. Phenoloc Compounds in Food and Their Effects on Health II Washington: American Chemical Society Symposium Series.

24. Grobbee, DE, et al (1990). Coffee, caffeine and cardiovascular disease in men. The New England Journal of Medicine 323:1026-1032

25. Bak AAA, et al (1991). Caffeine, blood pressure, and serum lipids. Am J Clin Nut, 53:971-975

26. Stamler J, et al (1997). Relation of body mass and alcohol, nutrient, fiber and caffeine intakes to blood pressure in the special intervention and usual care 5 groups in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Am J Clin Nut, 65(Supp.): 338-365

27. Willett WC, et al (1996). Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in women. A ten-year follow up. JAMA 275: 458-462

28. Woodward M, et al (1999). Coffee and tea consumption in the Scottish Heart Health Study follow-up: conflicting relations with coronary risk factors, coronary disease and all-cause mortality. J. Epidemiology and Community Health, 53: 481-487

29. Nutritional Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease (1994). Report of the Cardiovascular Review Group Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Department of Health 30. Ross G et al (2000). Association of coffee and caffeine intake with the risk of Parkinson Disease. JAMA, 283:2674-2679

31. Ascherio A, et al (2001). Prospective study of caffeine consumption and risk of Parkinson’s disease in men and women. Ann Neurol, 50(1):56-63

32. Diamond S, et al (2000). The Use of Ibuprofen Plus Caffeine to Treat Tensiontype Headache. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics;68:312-319

33. Food Standards Agency (2001). Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment. Statement on the Reproductive Effects of Caffeine

34. National Drinks Survey, April 2001


Nutrition – Starting From Zero

We are constantly bombarded with messages from the media telling us that foods we have consumed for years are suddenly bad for us. One day eggs are good for you, the next day they are bad for your heart – what is the actual situation now?

You can’t afford to miss the information in the new movie “Food Matters” – Click the Title to find out more.

You need to eat more leafy green vegetables, reduce your consumption of bad fats (saturated animal fats), increase your consumption of good fats (like olive oil and avocado), eat quality lean protein, eat more fish (but beware of the mercury!), reduce your intake of sugar. Eat fewer processed foods. So what is the bottom line? What are nutritionists trying to tell you? It all boils down to the fact that what you don’t eat is more important than what you do eat.

Start From Zero
The best way to figure out what you should be eating to live up to your highest health potential is to start from recording what you are eating. It’s so easy to forget that extra bit of something. So, use your digital camera or phone camera. Every time you eat, stop, think, take a picture. Remember that the camera doesn’t lie. At the end of each day, write a list of the foods shown in those pictures. This may take a while, but you will be able to see that most foods can be broken down into a few simple categories at their basic ingredients:

  • Meat (beef, pork,chicken, fish, other seafood, etc)
  • Dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt, cream, desserts, etc)
  • Corn products (bread, chips, popcorn, etc)
  • Wheat (pastas, breads, desserts, etc)
  • Soy (bread, desserts, drinks, anything processed, etc)
  • Fruit
  • Vegetables
  • Water
  • Energy drinks
  • Alcoholic drinks

Now take out a fresh piece of paper and add only the items that fall under the category of fruits and vegetables. This is what is called starting from zero. Remove everything that does not contribute to your health and only add back those items that you know are good for you. Mark whether the food is natural or processed. Aim for unprocessed, preferably organic, fruit and vegetables.

Why Fruits and Vegetables?

The governments of the world recommend that you eat between 5 to 10 fruits and vegetables every day. This recommendation is a great one and it has helped dozens of people lose weight and become healthier. It’s easy eat 5 to 10 fruits and vegetables a day by eliminating other snacks like muffins, cakes or cookies. Apples, bananas, mandarin’s, oranges are easy to take with you almost anywhere, just wash them at home to make life a bit easier.  Find out more about the colors of fruit & vegetables HERE

It is only by eliminating the unhealthy, extraneous or over-processed foods that you will be able to incorporate the recommended quantity of healthy ones.

The Building Blocks of Health
Think of this exercise as a way to build up your health, starting from the base. By eliminating meat, dairy and aggravating grains from your diet you prepare your body for proper nutrition. You allow yourself to cleanse and you provide your body with all the enzymes, the minerals and the vitamins that your body requires for proper functioning.

Find out more about Enzymes by viewing our Enzyme Series HERE

Looking at the new list of healthy foods, you might see that it needs to be improved upon a bit. Why not add some new and exotic fruits and vegetables that you never tried before? Add more healthful grains in the form of brown rice, quinoa, barley and buckwheat if you find you need something denser. Old fashioned foods like rolled oats are great for you as well as tasting good.

Give Yourself a New Start
By starting fresh you give your body a break and a chance to rejuvenate itself. If you decide that you would like to add some of the things from the original list back into your diet, do so only 30 days after this exercise. Then watch to see how your body reacts to this newly added food. If you don’t experience any side effects then you can continue to eat it, once again. Otherwise you have proof that it was never that good for you in the first place.

To rejuvenate your body read our Cell Rejuvenation Series HERE

Some Shortcuts to Better Health

Eliminate fat and oil already consumed by using Corn Fiber Plus – the ingredients bind with the fat so it’s eliminated naturally.

Add Spirulina, Chlorella and Stabilized Rice Bran into your diet – for the benefit of concentrated nutrition.

Make sure you’re properly hydrated – with the right purified water – Hexagon Energized Living Water

Improve your Nutrition Intelligence HERE

To your health!


Colotrim – All Natural Ingredients


Colotrim contains a special blend of these powerful all-natural ingredients:

Goldenseal is a powerful natural disinfectant that helps kill harmful bacteria and unwanted parasite.

x Goldenseal is a cure-all type of herb that strengthens the immune system, acts as an antibiotic, has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, potentiates insulin, and cleanses vital organs. It promotes the functioning capacity of the heart, the lymphatic and respiratory system, the liver, the spleen, the pancreas, and the colon.

Taken internally, Goldenseal increases digestive secretions, astringes the mucous membranes that line the gut, and checks inflammation. It also aids digestion by promoting the production of saliva, bile, and other digestive enzymes. In addition it may control heavy menstrual and postpartum bleeding by means of its astringent action.

Buckthorne root assists in healthy stool formation.

x Buckthorne root aids liver congestion, helps to carry blood and liver toxins out of the body. Good for gall stones, and lead poisoning. Calms the gastro-intestinal tract, is amild laxative, good for chronic constipation, and keeps the bowels regulated. Relieves dropsy (excess fluid accommodation in tissues or body cavity). Used for hemorrhoids, colic (abdominal pain caused by spasm), obesity, acute appendicitis, ulcerative colitis (inflammation of the colon).

Pumpkin seed provides excellent assistance to help sweep out waste as it moves through the colon.

x Pumpkin seeds are one of nature’s almost perfect foods. They are a natural source of beneficial constituents such as carbohydrates, amino acids and unsaturated fatty acids. They contain most of the B vitamins, along with C, D, E, and K. They also have the minerals calcium, potassium, niacin, and phosphorous. Pumpkin seeds have mainly been used to treat prostate and bladder problems, but they have also been known to help with depression and learning disabilities.

Licorice root provides assistance in soothing gastrointestinal irritations and inflammations.

x Licorice was used historically to treat the skin and coughs. It is also used to treat constipation, bronchitis, inflammation, and arthritis. Licorice may be prescribed by health care providers to treat adrenocortical insufficiency, peptic ulcer, and chronic gastritis.

Traditional Chinese Medicine uses licorice to treat problems from tuberculosis to diabetes. Restrained production of cortisol and anti-inflammatory effects are caused by the flavonoids and glycyrrhizin in licorice. Research has shown that licorice flavonoids can kill the bacteria that causes stomach inflammation and ulcers, called Helicobacter pylori.

Ginger root helps to relieve weak digestion and malabsorption.

x Ginger Root has been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years and is known to be greatly beneficial in reducing nausea and upset stomachs. It was used in Greek culture for making breads, the forerunner of the delicious gingerbread we enjoy today.

The plant is native to Southeast Asia, however due to the many benefits of Ginger Root, today it is cultivated around the world in many diverse locations.

Fennel seed is used to promote healthy digestion and support a healthy appetite.

x Fennel seeds often provide quick and effective relief from many digestive disorders. They help to overcome gas, cramps, acid indigestion, and many other digestive tract maladies.

These seeds are very rich in minerals including magnesium. Two of its main constituents are Anethol and Fenchone. Anethol and other terpenoids may inhibit spasms in smooth muscles such as those in the intestinal tract. Fenchone may be responsible for the medicinal properties associated with Fennel.

Recent studies have found that consumption of fennel can increase the production of bile and may also possess diuretic, pain-reducing and anti-microbial activities.

Cascara Sagrada is used to promote movement in the colon and alleviate constipation.

x Cascara sagrada has a long history of traditional use by native americans. Cascara sagrada contains compounds called anthroquinones, which are responsible for cascara’s powerful laxative effects. Anthraquinones trigger contractions in the colon, called peristalsis, which causes the urge to have a bowel movement. Today, it is one of the most common herbal laxatives.

In addition to being a powerful laxative, cascara is also believed to improve the muscle tone of the colon walls.

Rhubarb is a natural Laxative that promotes healthy digestion.

x It is recognized that rhubarb not only exercises a digestive action but it operates directly as a conveyer of bile salts. When it reaches the stomach its digestive effects come into full play, causing an increase of the flow of gastric juice and inducing their movement, thus favoring the processing of the contents of the stomach. Besides stimulating the secretions from the liver which convey the bile salts, it assists the intestine in regulating the absorption of fats.

Rhubarb is used as a laxative, antiphlogistic, and homeostatic in the treatment of constipation, diarrhea, jaundice, gastro-intestinal hemorrhage, menstrual disorders, conjunctivitis, traumatic injuries, superficial suppurative sores and ulcers.


Look After Your Body – Five Common Mistakes People Make When Looking After Their Body

Common Mistake Number 1

Thinking you will be young forever. Youth is very forgiving of late nights, early mornings, and poor eating habits. Later in life that the sins of your youth can catch up with you. Too much alcohol, sun exposure or other bad habits can leave lasting ill effects. As you age, the signs of excess in your youth will start appearing.

Solution: Realize you’re not “bullet proof”, and look after your health and well-being from any early age. It’s never too early to be aware of your body’s needs.

Common Mistake Number 2.

Eating too much fast food laden with sugar, salt and fats. Sure it’s a quick fix when you’re hungry and in a rush, but is the lingering regret worth it?

Solution: THINK before you eat. Look for better quality offerings. It’s actually becoming easier to find fast food which is healthier. If you can only find pizza, then add a salad and cut down on the number of pizza slices you consume. Beware of salad dressings, use olive oil and vinegar to get the benefits of both.

Common Mistake Number 3

Not drinking enough water. It’s a fact that a majority of people are trying to get through their busy lives in a dehydrated state.

Solution: Drink 9 to 12 glasses of water each day. Seem too much or too difficult? Drink 1 glass on waking, 1 glass before breakfast, 1 glass after you clean your teeth in the morning, 1 glass mid-morning, 1 glass after each time you go to the restroom (say 4/5 times a day), 1 glass before lunch, 1 glass mid-afternoon, 1 glass when you get home from work, 1 glass before dinner, 1 glass after dinner, 1 glass after you clean your teeth in the evening. Use daily events as “triggers” for your water consumption. Try to drink purified, energized water at all times.

Common Mistake Number 4

Smoking cigarettes. It’s now well recognized that smoking is extremely detrimental to your health. Also avoid “second hand” smoke.

Solution: Never smoke, simply don’t start. If you currently smoke give it up – your body will love you for it. Keep away from places where you’ll be exposed to smoke.

Common Mistake Number 5

Thinking it’s too late to do anything to improve your health. Don’t give up on you!

Solution: Remember that the cells in your body are constantly being renewed. Give your cells the best possible chance to be repaired and rejuvenated. Nourish your body with natural superfoods to provide concentrated nutrition and antioxidants, keep your body alkalized, hydrated and detoxified.


Your Personal Firewall Against An Acidic Body – Part 6 – The Solution & FAQ

What is the easiest way to consume vinegar to protect my body?

Take vinegar in the form of tablets, very easy and convenient!

Mixed vinegar tablets to alkalize your body
Each tablet contains concentrated vinegar derived from apple cider, grain sorghum, pea, wheat, barley and rice bran. It is rich in natural vinegar nutrients, acetic acid and citric acid. The bio-activity of the vinegars is well preserved with an advanced processing technique.

Each Mixed Vinegar tablet contains vinegar from natural sources.

Oriyen Mixed Vinegar tablets are:

Easy to eat – does not taste acidic, nor leave an acidic after taste.

Does not harm teeth.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. I heard that liquid vinegar is very effective. Why should I choose vinegar in a tablet form?
Vinegar tablets are actually more concentrated and more effective than liquid vinegar. Highly concentrated vinegar extract would be too sour for consumption in liquid form. In order to give you multiple benefits, different types of concentrated vinegars are blended into each tablet. Liquid vinegar usually only contains one or two types. Finally, tablets are obviously more convenient; you can take them any time, anywhere.

2. Can I chew the vinegar tablet?
No. It is much better to swallow the tablet with water. The best way to take a vinegar tablet is to take a sip of water leaving a bit of water in your mouth, then place the tablet into your mouth and swallow immediately. Drink more water if required.

3. Can I take vinegar tablets with other beverages (such as fruit juice) instead of warm water?
Yes. However, we do not recommend that you take vinegar tablets with dairy-based or high protein beverages.

4. Can I take vinegar tablets with hot water?
Yes, the temperature will not affect the vinegar, but it’s important to make sure that you do not use water that could scald your mouth.

5. I’m healthy and not suffering from any aches and pains, is there a need for me to take vinegar tablets?
Vinegar tablets can help anyone to maintain health. They are especially great for people who have stressful lifestyles and unhealthy eating habits because vinegar tablets help to counteract acidity in the body.

6. Can I take vinegar tablets while I’m on other health supplements?
Certainly. Vinegar tablets will not reduce the efficacy of other supplements. In fact, they help the body to absorb nutrients such as Vitamin B Complex, Calcium and Iron better. Vinegar tablets also offer many other health benefits. However, we do not recommend taking vinegar tablets along with probiotics supplements.

7. My body is weak, and I was advised to avoid sour foods. Since vinegar is very sour, will taking vinegar tablets cause any undesirable effects to my body?
No, it will not. On the contrary, it benefits your body as it increases absorption of other nutrients.

8. I’m currently taking medication for hypertension, diabetes & etc prescribed by my doctor. Can I take vinegar tablets and how should I take them?

Yes, you can. However, we recommend an interval of 3 hours between intake of your medication and vinegar tablets.

9. Will I be dependent on vinegar tablets? If I stop taking vinegar tablets, will my body revert to its previously unhealthy state?
Vinegar tablets do not cause dependency. However, if you stop taking the tablets and do not change your unhealthy lifestyle and eating habits e.g. excessive intake of meat, refined food and insufficient intake of dietary fibre, your body could revert to its previously unhealthy state.

10. I’m a vegetarian. Can I take vinegar tablets?
Yes. Our vinegar tablets are made of apple cider and cereal vinegar, and do not contain animal products.

11. Who should not take vinegar tablets?
People suffering from serious gastritis and gastric ulcer should not take vinegar tablets.

12. Are there any other uses for vinegar tablets?
Yes, vinegar tablets:

  • Help digestion, prevent thirst and regulate bodily functions
  • Freshen breath and promote secretion of saliva
  • Act as a teapot cleaning agent: Add one tablet into the pot and boil together with the water to remove stubborn stains inside the teapot
  • Help to clean and maintain healthy feet: Grind 1 tablet into powder and mix into a bowl of warm water. Soak your feet in it for 10-15 minutes before bedtime
  • Keep vegetables fresh: Grind half a tablet into powder and add into water, then soak the vegetables in water for 5 minutes,
  • Prevent flowers from withering: Grind 1 tablet into powder and add to the water in the vase.
  • Protect your pets from fleas and mites: Grind 1 tablet into powder and dissolve it into your pet’s drinking water.

13. Is there a different dosage for children and adults?
Yes, please refer to the guide below.

Recommended dosage:
For children 6 years or older 2 tablets after meal, twice daily.
For adults (maintenance) 5 tablets after meal, twice daily.
For adults (improvement) 10 tablets after meal, twice daily.