What are Probiotics and Why Do I Need Them?

Optimal Health Begins in the digestive tract.

Aging, dieting, stress, travel and certain medications can disrupt the natural balance of intestinal microflora in our digestive system. Probiotics are “friendly” bacteria that promote healthy digestive flora, to support healthy digestion. In fact, the word probiotic means “for life”.

Not only is a healthy digestive system important to help you get the nutrients you need from food, but it also helps the body stay healthy. Maintaining a healthy digestive system can help us avoid the occasional symptoms of intestinal discomfort and keep us enjoying overall health and wellness.

Intestinal Probiotic enhancers are designed to improve gastrointestinal function and intestinal good bacterial microbial balance. Lactospore increases enzymes for improving digestion and enhances the bioavailability of nutrients from the food. Unlike many probiotics, Lactospore does not cause gas or bloating.

Bowtrol Probiotic contains 9 Billion live probiotic cells, more than 5 times the live active cultures typically found in yogurt, but without the sugar and calories. Unlike many other probiotics, the Bowtrol Probiotic is specially designed to survive the acidic stomach environment and be delivered to the intestines.


Noni Gia – Tahitian Noni – Natural Superfood

Noni GIA is an exciting new product from bHIP Global that is a blend of powdered Tahitian noni juice, pineapple juice and grape juice. The word Gia comes from the word “Energia” which means “Energy” in Spanish. Noni GIA supports your immune system by delivering a remarkable supply of antioxidants to help rid the body of harmful free radicals. It increases both energy and physical performance.  Click HERE or on the image to find out more.

ImageNoni GIA is an organic powdered product that is conveniently available in sachet format.


Temperatures in Tahiti range from 20 to 30 degrees Celsius year round, guaranteeing good harvests. Tahiti is far from the corrupting influences of global pollution. The water is fresh and pure, the winds blow clean air and
the soil is rich from tropical vegetation and the minerals of volcanic
activity. This pristine land provides an ideal environment to grow the
perfect noni fruit.

Noni Fruit

Pacific Islanders have enjoyed the health benefits of noni fruit for over two thousand years. Without any sophisticated or advanced technologies, they have relied on the noni plant for many medicinal uses. The modern medical world has taken note of the many benefits of the noni plant.

Through centuries of use as a folk medicine, the noni plant has been linked but not limited to the following:

IMMUNE SYSTEM

Strengthens the immune system and builds resistance against disease.

BLOOD CIRCULATION, TISSUES, AND CELLS

Delivers powerful antioxidants which helps to rid the body of harmful free radicals and to increase energy.

DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

Supports the natural function of the digestive system, improving nutrient absorption.

ANTIBACTERIAL AND ANTIFUNGAL

The presence of active compounds such as anthraquinones and terpenes helps the body to fight harmful bacteria and fungus.

OTHER BENEFITS

Enhances mental clarity, increases concentration and maximizes performance.


Anti Cancer – A New Way Of Life – Part 2 – Inflammation The Enemy Within

In his book “Anti Cancer – A New Way Of Life” Dr David Servan-Schreiber discusses how inflammation is our enemy.

Inflammation in our bodies is a reaction to some sort of damage to our cells, through some sort of shock or physical trauma like, burns, cuts, infections by viruses or bacteria, even rubbing and chafing.

Inflammation is described as:-

it’s red, it’s swollen, it’s warm and it’s painful.

Our immune systems react to inflammation to heal our bodies in ways far too technical for me to understand fully or describe.  The problem is that apparently there is also another face to our immune response to inflammation – it can work against us by over-reacting and being diverted to promote cancerous growths.

There are distinct links between certain types of cancers and inflammation. For example:-

Cervical cancer – papilloma virus

Liver cancer – Hepatitis virus

Dr Servan-Schreiber’s book obviously gives much more information.

In short, inflammation has a key role in promoting cancer and we should do all we can to avoid it.

So how can we avoid and reduce inflammation in our bodies?

By eating the right foods, managing our stress levels, getting regular exercise and trying to remove toxins from our environment.

I can recommend the following to assist you in reducing the inflammation in your body:-

Link to the Top 6 Ways to Detoxify Your Body

Link to Your Personal Firewall

Link to How to Improve Your Enzyme Potential

Link to Stabilized Rice Bran


Tea & Caffeine – What’s the Story?

What is Caffeine?

Caffeine is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves, seeds or fruits of at least 100 different species worldwide and is part of a group of compounds known as methylxanthines. The most commonly known sources of caffeine are coffee, cocoa beans, cola nuts and tea leaves. People have enjoyed caffeinated beverages for many years. Caffeine is also added to specifically formulated ‘energy drinks’ and pharmaceutical products such as cold and flu remedies.


Coffee and tea also contain other dimethylxanthines; theophylline which has similar properties to caffeine and theobromine whose pharmacological actions is far less potent than caffeine and theophylline.

The amount of caffeine present in products depends on the type of the product, the serving size and the preparation method. For example a 190ml cup of tea contains 50mg of caffeine, one third less than the same amount of an instant cup of coffee (75mg). Table 1 below gives an indication of the amount of caffeine found in other drinks compared to tea:

Table 1 – Type of Product Caffeine (mg/ serving)

  • Tea All types 50mg/ 190ml serving (1)
  • Coffee Brewed (filter or percolated) 100-115mg/ 190ml serving (1)
  • Instant 75mg/ 190ml serving 1 Cola drinks Standard and Sugar Free 11-70mg/ 330 ml can (2)
  • ‘Energy’ drinks All types 28-87mg/ 250ml serving (2)
  • Chocolate Bar 5.5-35.5mg/ 50g bar (2)

On average we consume 3.98mg of caffeine /kg body weight per day ie 239mg/ day for a 60kg person (3).

What is a safe intake of caffeine?

Up to 300mg/day (6 cups of tea) is considered moderate, with no evidence of harmful effects in the vast majority of the adult population. Some individuals are sensitive to caffeine and will feel effects at smaller doses than other individuals who are less sensitive. For this reason, these individuals may need to limit their caffeine intake.

Metabolism and Clearance

Caffeine does not accumulate in the body over a course of time and is normally excreted within several hours of consumption. The rate of caffeine elimination varies between individuals and this maybe as a result of genetic factors affecting the enzymes involved in the metabolism, or due to certain lifestyle factors e.g., smoking.

Children also metabolize caffeine at a quicker rate. Generally caffeine absorption is complete within about one hour after ingestion and the plasma concentration peaks (2) after about 60-90 minutes. The half-life of caffeine in the plasma is about 2.5 – 4.5 hours in healthy adults.

Caffeine Tolerance

A number of different factors affect individual tolerance to caffeine, including the amount ingested, the frequency of caffeine consumption and individual metabolism. It is widely recognized that gradual tolerance develops with prolonged caffeine use.

Physiological Effects

Caffeine is a pharmacologically active substance, and depending on the dose, has a number of actions:-

• Central Nervous System Stimulant. A moderate caffeine intake can cause mild stimulation that maybe beneficial in terms of increased alertness, concentration, improved performance and decreased fatigue. (5-10) However, higher intakes may affect sleep, cause nervousness and an irregular heartbeat.

• Weak Bronchodilator. As a result, interest has been shown in its potential role as an asthma treatment. A number of studies have explored the effects of caffeine in asthma and the conclusions from a Cochrane Review suggest that caffeine appears to improve airways function modestly in people with asthma for up to four hours after consumption. (11)

• Diuretic. The diuretic action of caffeine may be due to an increase in renal blood flow, leading to an increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or due to a decreased re-absorption of sodium in the renal tubules. The diuretic effect of caffeine is dependent on the amount consumed and duration of intake e.g. the caffeine in tea does not have a diuretic effect unless the amount of tea consumed at one sitting contains more than 250-300mg of caffeine, equivalent to between 5 and 6 cups of tea. (12-17).

In fact, due to the volume of fluid that is drunk whilst enjoying a cup of tea, the British Dietetic Association advises that tea can contribute towards the daily recommended fluid intake of 1.5 to 2 litres.

• Cardiac Muscle Stimulant. Moderate caffeine consumption does not increase cardiac arrhythmias. (18)

If regular caffeine consumption is stopped abruptly, symptoms such as headaches, irritability and fatigue may occur. These effects are usually temporary, disappearing after a day or so and can be avoided if caffeine cessation is gradual.

Caffeine and Health

The role of caffeine in the development of certain diseases and conditions has been the subject of extensive research in recent years.

Cancer.

A number of studies investigating the impact of caffeine in the development of cancer have failed to establish a relationship. (19-22) In fact, tea is one of the richest sources of flavonoids, a powerful group of antioxidants. The role of antioxidants in the prevention of free radical damage has led to suggestions that tea maybe anti-carcinogenic. (23). Despite interesting preliminary research, further work is required to prove its beneficial effect in this area.

Heart Disease.

The relationship between caffeine and heart disease has been the subject of a number of studies, and results from these and epidemiological studies have led to the conclusion that the ingestion of moderate amounts of caffeine is not associated with any increased risk of heart disease. (24-28) The Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy concluded that ‘there is little evidence that caffeine itself has any relation with CHD risk’ in the 1994 Nutritional Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease report. (29)

Parkinson’s Disease.

Observational studies have suggested that caffeine may play a role in protecting against Parkinson’s disease, (30-31). Further research to try to determine the exact mechanism is required.

Relief of headaches.

In a study of 301 regular headache sufferers, researchers found that a combination of ibuprofen and caffeine was better than either drug alone in relieving pain. (32)

Although a caffeine ‘pill’ was used in this trial, the researchers believed that caffeinated beverages would work just as well. However, they did warn that chronic headache sufferers should avoid caffeine because it might exacerbate symptoms. More work is required in this field before firm conclusions about caffeine and pain relief can be drawn.

Pregnancy

Caffeine crosses the placenta and achieves blood and tissue concentrations in the foetus that are similar to maternal concentrations. For this reason recent advice published by the Food Standards Agency (33) recommends that pregnant women should limit their intake of caffeine consumption to less than 300mg/ day (equivalent to 6 cups of tea/ day). At this level there is little evidence to suggest that the health of the unborn child or mother is affected.

In Summary…

Despite recent publicity about caffeine, the fact remains that the consumption of caffeine at intakes of 300mg/ day has no adverse effects in the vast majority of the adult population. For this reason an average intake of three to four cups of tea (34) a day is well within the level considered safe.

Caffeine and Breastfeeding.

Caffeine enters breast-milk in small amounts (about 1% of the mother’s plasma level) but it does accumulate in smaller babies. Six to eight cups of coffee a day can result in infant wakefulness and hyperactivity. Smoking augments this effect. Of course the dose of caffeine from one cup of tea a day is nothing like the dose from several cups of coffee a day, but it makes sense to keep the dose the baby gets as low as possible.

References:-

1. Gray J (1998). Caffeine, coffee and health. Nutrition and Food Science 6:314- 319

2. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) (1998). Survey of caffeine and other methylxanthines in energy drinks and other caffeine containing products (updated). Food Surveillance Information Sheet No. 144 (No. 103 revised). London

3. Barone JJ, et al. (1996) Caffeine consumption. Food and Chemical Toxicology 34:119-129

4. Graham TE (1997) The possible actions of methylxanthines on various tissues. In Reily T., Orme M (eds). The clinical pharmacology of sports and exercise. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam. 257-270

5. Lieberman HR, et al (1987). The effects of low doses of caffeine on human performance and mood. Psychopharmacology 93:308-312

6. Jarvis M. (1993). Does caffeine intake enhance absolute levels of cognitive performance? Psychopharmacology 110:45-52

7. Hindmarch I, et al. (1998). The effects of black tea and other beverages on aspects of cognition and psychomotor performance. Psychopharmacology 139(3) :230-238

8. Smith AP, et al (1990-91). Effects of caffeine given before and after lunch on sustained attention. Neuropsychobiology 23(3): 160-163

9. Durlach PJ, et al (1998). The effects of a low dose of caffeine on cognitive performance. Psychopharmacology 140(1):116-119

10. Battig K. (1986) Effect of coffee on the speed of subject-paced information processing. Neuropsychobiology;16(2-3):126-30

11. Bara AI, Barley EA. (2001) Caffeine for asthma (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, 2, Oxford

12. Nussberger, J. et al. (1990) Caffeine-induced diuresis and atrial natriuretic peptides. Journal of cardiovascular Pharmacology, 15, 685-691

13. Neuhäuser-Berthold, M. et al. (1997) Coffee consumption and total body water homeostasis as measured by fluid balance and bioelectrical impedance analysis. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 41, 29-36

14. Martof, M.T. and Knox, D.K. (1997) The effect of xanthines on fluid balance. Clinical Nursing Research, 6:186-196

15. Stookey, J.D. (1999) The diuretic effects of alcohol and caffeine and total water intake misclassification. European Journal of Epidemiology, 15, 181-188 16. Passmore AP et al (1987) Renal and cardiovascular effects of caffeine: a dose response study. Clin. Sci. 72(6), 749-56

17. Grandjean AC et al (2000) The effect of caffeinated, non-caffeinated, caloric and non-caloric beverages on hydration. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 19(5), 591-600

18. Myers MG. (1991) Caffeine and cardiac arrhythmias. Annals of Int Med,114:147-150

19. Rosenberg L. (1990). Coffee and tea consumption in relation to the risk of large bowel cancer. A Review of Epidemiological Studies. Cancer Letters 52:163-171

20. Jacobsen BK, et al (1986). Coffee drinking, Mortality and Cancer Incidence: Results from a Norwegian prospective study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 76:823-831

21. Gordis, L (1990). Consumption of methylxanthine-containing beverages and risk of pancreatic cancer. Cancer Letters, 52:1-12

22. Lubin F, et al. (1990) Consumption of methylxanthine-containing beverages and the risk of breast cancer. Cancer Letters, 53:81-90

23. Huang MT, et al (1992). Phenolic compounds in food and cancer prevention. Phenoloc Compounds in Food and Their Effects on Health II Washington: American Chemical Society Symposium Series.

24. Grobbee, DE, et al (1990). Coffee, caffeine and cardiovascular disease in men. The New England Journal of Medicine 323:1026-1032

25. Bak AAA, et al (1991). Caffeine, blood pressure, and serum lipids. Am J Clin Nut, 53:971-975

26. Stamler J, et al (1997). Relation of body mass and alcohol, nutrient, fiber and caffeine intakes to blood pressure in the special intervention and usual care 5 groups in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Am J Clin Nut, 65(Supp.): 338-365

27. Willett WC, et al (1996). Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease in women. A ten-year follow up. JAMA 275: 458-462

28. Woodward M, et al (1999). Coffee and tea consumption in the Scottish Heart Health Study follow-up: conflicting relations with coronary risk factors, coronary disease and all-cause mortality. J. Epidemiology and Community Health, 53: 481-487

29. Nutritional Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease (1994). Report of the Cardiovascular Review Group Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Department of Health 30. Ross G et al (2000). Association of coffee and caffeine intake with the risk of Parkinson Disease. JAMA, 283:2674-2679

31. Ascherio A, et al (2001). Prospective study of caffeine consumption and risk of Parkinson’s disease in men and women. Ann Neurol, 50(1):56-63

32. Diamond S, et al (2000). The Use of Ibuprofen Plus Caffeine to Treat Tensiontype Headache. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics;68:312-319

33. Food Standards Agency (2001). Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment. Statement on the Reproductive Effects of Caffeine

34. National Drinks Survey, April 2001


Your Personal Firewall Against An Acidic Body – Part 5 – Regulate Your Body

Regulate Your Body pH To Restore & Maintain Prime Health

A healthy person’s blood pH level should be slightly alkaline (in the range of pH 7.35 – pH 7.45). However, most people today have an acidic blood level due to pollution, poor eating habits, stress and lack of exercise. This acidity adds to the stress of the organs involved in blood circulation and cleansing, such as the liver, heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, etc. As a result of this stress, many organs start to deteriorate, which may lead to health conditions, diseases and ailments such as fatigue, body aches and cardiovascular diseases that could develop into chronic diseases or even cancer.

An acidic body is primarily caused by a diet high in meat or refined carbohydrates. The lack of dietary fibre leads to the accumulation of animal fats, resulting in hardening of the blood vessels and stress on the organs. Once weakened, the body is susceptible to disease.

The Crucial Influence of pH Level on Health

The advantages of blood alkalinity

Blood that is slightly alkaline flows much smoother in the body. This efficient circulation allows greater amount of oxygen and nutrients to be transported and absorbed by the body. This helps to raise the metabolic rate, increase cell vitality, and improve overall energy. Slightly alkaline blood not only prevents arteries from hardening, but also reduces the amount of deposited fat on the arterial walls. This free blood flow helps reduce the potential for and symptoms of many cardiovascular diseases.

Slight alkalinity is a sign of good health; it indicates that the body’s immune system i.e. natural resistance and healing capacity, is in good condition, and able to resist the onset of many diseases.

The disadvantages of body acidity

Acidic blood has a higher viscosity. This prevents smooth blood flow, leading to poor oxygen transfer. The poor flow rate also leads to the hardening of blood vessels.

Cholesterol, adipose tissue, triglycerides, and other harmful compounds tend to accumulate on the cell wall when the blood is acidic. This can result in atherosclerosis (narrowing of arteries) and can accelerate hardening of the blood vessels, or lead to the accumulation of toxins in the body which can cause chronic disease.

Are you plagued by an acidic body?

Answer the following questions to find out for yourself!

If you have 5 or more of the listed symptoms, then there is a high chance that your body is acidic.

Move or perform tasks at a very slow pace. (You have the will but not the strength to perform tasks.)
Feel sleepy when you ride in a car or drive
Feel tired after mild exercise. Short of breath (panting) when walking up or down the stairs
Suffer from poor memory and concentration
Experience coldness in the limbs
Bruise easily, experience frequent skin breakouts, or bleeding gums
Prone to eczema
Have dull complexion or acne
Suffer from athlete’s foot
Tend to suffer infections (pus) on wounds
Suffer a protruding abdomen even though overall average in size.
Easily put on weight / Difficulty controlling body weight
Suffer from constipation or frequent diarrhoea
Have bad breath
Frequently suffer from tinnitus
Frequently feel dizzy, feeling very tired especially in the afternoons
Have weak immune system; prone to flu and fever
Frequently bitten by mosquitoes / insects


Lifestyle and diet

If you check 5 or more boxes, your lifestyle and diet could be contributing to an acidic body.

Frequent all-nighters or late nights (sleep after 1am)
Frequently eat supper, or have dinner after 8pm
Frequently skip breakfast
Smoke
Drink alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, whisky, etc.)
Drink more than 3 cups of coffee daily
Drink carbonated beverages daily
Frequently consume meat
Eat very little fruits and vegetables
Drink less than 2000ml of water each day, or drink water that is acidic (distilled water, RO water)
Like to eat processed food, fried food or sweet snacks
Lack physical exercise
Live or work under constant pressure , and usually find it difficult to de-stress
Constantly in a polluted environment (surrounded by second hand cigarette smoke, waste gas from factories, etc.)

Do not be “ambushed” by acid

Humans are born with a body that is slightly alkaline, but on average, our bodies tend to become acidic after the age of 25. This is due to ageing, environmental and food pollution, poor diet, stress, unhealthy, sedentary lifestyle, overworking, etc. Acidity can be the cause of many diseases because it impedes normal enzyme functions. In a study carried out by the University of Tokyo, up to 90% out of the 600 cancer patients surveyed have an acidic body, of which, 85% have pH levels of 5.8 and below. “Immune cells” are adversely affected by acidity and may succumb to cellular poisoning or death if exposed to it for prolonged periods. With the immune cells severely depleted or damaged, virus and other disease-causing agents can wreak havoc in the body. Approximately 40 million members of Japan’s various “golden years” clubs are actively promoting vinegar as one of the best products for reducing fatigue, and returning the body to its normal alkaline pH level. These Japanese in their golden years drink large amounts of “vinegar” during meals to improve overall bodily functions and revitalise the organs. It is no coincidence that the Japanese have the highest human life expectancy in the world!

The best way to overcome an acidic body is to consume more alkaline food and beverages.

Alkaline food

Most vegetables, garlic, mushrooms, onion, wheatgrass, etc.
Algae: chlorophyta, spirulina, seaweed, etc.
Most fruits: apple, banana, lemon, grape, orange, watermelon, pineapple, Japanese plum, strawberry, etc.
Sprouts like alfalfa…


Acidic food

Almost all meat products: beef, chicken, pork, duck
Almost all seafood: fish, oyster, prawns, etc.
Most grains & beans: flour, bread, corn, plain rice, noodles, pasta, biscuit, wheat, barley, etc.
Dairy products: butter, milk, cheese, cake, etc.
Almost all oil and fats, including corn oil and olive oil
Others: coffee, carbonated drinks, refined sugar, alcoholic drinks, medicine, food tainted with pesticides and insecticides, canned or pickled foods

Nutrition Intelligence – Glossary – Antioxidants, Vitamins, Phytochemicals

Glossary of Terms you may find useful. Got something you can add? Just post a comment with the details.

A

Antioxidants Group of nutrients (vitamins, minerals, enzymes, phyto-nutrients, phyto-chemicals) which help protect your body from free radicals (caused by normal body functions, aging, pollutants, pesticides, antibiotic use and other factors).

Adaptogen – That which helps boost, balance and normalize functions in your body.

B

Bioflavanoids – Sometimes referred to as Vitamin P, these help to enhance the absorption of Vitamin C. The human body does not produce these so they must be supplied by your diet. They help to promote circulation, stimulate bile production, and act with Vitamin C to preserve and protect the structure of capillary blood vessels.

D

Demulcent – Helps to soothe and relieve internal inflammation.

E

Emollient – Helps to soothe and soften inflamed tissue

F

Free Radicals – A single or group of unstable molecules/atoms that can cause damage to cells, leading to breakdown and disease. Visualize and apple – when you cut it and leave the cut surface exposed to air.It turns brown, almost like it’s rusting. Oxidization has occurred. In a similar way unstable oxygen molecules in your body are the free radicals that cause your unprotected organs to “rust” and breakdown.

P

Phytochemicals – Literally meaning “plant chemicals”, phytochemicals are protective food factors derived from a variety of plant sources. Phtyochemicals have powerful health benefits. Whenever there is plant life, phytochemicals protect plants from attack by their enemies in the environment, like bacteria, viruses, radiation and insects. Research is now showing that we can benefit from these life-sustaining qualities as well. Good news for us. Plants have been in existence much longer than man and know much more about survival. Research indicates that phytochemicals can provide protection against some types of cancer.

T

Tonic – A product that is strengthening and invigorating.

V

Vitamins really deserve there own glossary! Vitamins are organic chemicals that are necessary for growth, metabolism, and overall health and well-being. Vitamins originate in food, and are categorized as either fat soluble (meaning they can be stored in the body for long periods of time) OR water soluble (these pass easily through our bodies, cannot be stored, must be replenished daily).

Vitamin A – Also known as Beta Carotene, a fat-soluble vitamin essential for cell growth, development, reproduction, and immunity. It is stored primarily in the liver and is considered one of the most potent antioxidants.

Vitamin B1 – Also known as Thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin, beneficial to the nervous system. It helps to convert blood sugar (glucose) into energy.

Vitamin B2 – Also known as Riboflavin, a water-soluble vitamin which helps with energy production. It must be replaced constantly. It is the most common deficiency.

Vitamin B3 – Also known as Niacin, a water-soluble vitamin, a major player against heart disease. It helps to lower cholesterol and high blood pressure.

Vitamin B6 – Also known as Pyridoxine, this water-soluble vitamin goes through the body in only 8 hours. It is needed for red-blood cell production and cellular growth. It also plays a key role in the immune system and antibody production.

Vitamin B12 – Also known as Cyanocobalamin, a water-soluble vitamin known for its energizing capabilities. It is essential for nerve tissue, promotes growth, memory and regenerates red blood cells.

Vitamin B15 – Also known as Pantothenic Acid, this water-soluble vitamin helps protect against cardiovascular disease as ell as helping with symptoms of arthritis. It helps encourage healing, protects the liver and immune system.

Biotin -This water-soluble vitamin is essential for the metabolism of vitamin C, fat and protein. It helps with healthy hair, skin and nails.

Vitamin C – This water-soluble vitamin is essential for formation of collagen (exists between cells to hold tissue together). It is necessary for growth and integrity of bones, blood vessels, teeth and gums. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and has many powerful properties; anti-cancer, prevention of blood clots.

Vitamin D – This is a fat-soluble vitamin that the skin can produce on its own when exposed to direct sunlight. In only 15 minutes a day, your body can manufacture all it needs. It is not very abundant in food, and is stored in the liver for future use.

Vitamin E – This fat-soluble vitamin is stored in many places; the heart, liver, reproductive organs, fatty tissue, and muscles. It basically works for the nervous system. It is a potent antioxidant, and helps to combat heart disease, by keeping good cholesterol (HDL) high, blood thin and blood pressure low.


One Way to Reduce your Carbon Footprint – Use Filtered Water, Refill Your Own Bottle

One simple way is to stop buying bottled water.


Consider the environmental impact of bottled water, the process involved in making the bottles, then the problem of disposing of them. A huge environmental impact.

Then there is the question of the quality of the water in the bottle.

One solution is to buy a great water filter and refill you own bottles (preferably glass containers).

Find out more about Hexagon Water Here

Shop Here