Green Tea and Gum Health

Benefits of Green Tea
Benefits of Green Tea

A recent press release issued by the American Academy of Periodontolgy states that  the results of a study suggests that antioxidants in green tea may help reduce periodontal disease.

Asian cultures have for thousands of years appreciated the health benefits of green tea. Finally these benefits are being researched and validated.

The increasing awareness of the value of green tea in your daily diet has now also made green tea a popular beverage in the West.

Ancient Chinese and Japanese medicine believed green tea consumption could cure disease and heal wounds, recent scientific studies are beginning to establish the potential health benefits of drinking green tea, especially in weight loss, heart health, and cancer prevention.

Yet another benefit of drinking green tea has been discovered. Results of a study published in the Journal of Periodontology, revealed that routine intake of green tea may also help promote healthy teeth and gums.

The study analyzed the periodontal health of 940 men, and found that those who regularly drank green tea had superior periodontal health than subjects that consumed less green tea.

“It has been long speculated that green tea possesses a host of health benefits,” said study author Dr. Yoshihiro Shimazaki of Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan. “And since many of us enjoy green tea on a regular basis, my colleagues and I were eager to investigate the impact of green tea consumption on periodontal health, especially considering the escalating emphasis on the connection between periodontal health and overall health.”

Male participants aged 49 through 59 were examined on three indicators of periodontal disease: periodontal pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL) of gum tissue, and bleeding on probing (BOP) of the gum tissue. Researchers observed that for every one cup of green tea consumed per day, there was a decrease in all three indicators, therefore signifying a lower instance of periodontal disease in those subjects who regularly drank green tea.

Green tea’s ability to help reduce symptoms of periodontal disease may be due to the presence of the antioxidant catechin. Previous research has demonstrated antioxidants’ ability to reduce inflammation in the body, and the indicators of periodontal disease measured in this study, PD, CAL and BOP, suggest the existence of an inflammatory response to periodontal bacteria in the mouth. By interfering with the body’s inflammatory response to periodontal bacteria, green tea may actually help promote periodontal health, and ward off further disease. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the gums and bone supporting the teeth, and has been associated with the progression of other diseases such as

“Periodontists believe that maintaining healthy gums is absolutely critical to maintaining a healthy body,” says Dr. David Cochran, DDS, Ph.D., President of the AAP and Chair of the Department of Periodontics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. “That is why it is so important to find simple ways to boost periodontal health, such as regularly drinking green tea – something already known to possess certain health-related benefits.”

Make your own green tea – find out how


Desperately Want that Weight Loss Tea?

Healthy, Weight Loss Green Tea

If you’re like quite a few other people, many of whom have written to me, wanting to know where to buy weight loss tea in their local area you’ll love this!

I’ve found a new way for you to get the wonderful health benefits of green tea… There’s a one-off payment of (currently) US$49.97 – so you don’t have to worry about recurring payments and no delivery charges.

Click to get instant access!

Green4Tea


Green Tea Catechins Burn Fat

Finally the mainstream market is recognizing the benefits of green tea.

The following quote is from green tea supplier, Japan based, Taiyo.


“The huge consumer interest in foods that can play a role in health and wellbeing has brought green tea squarely into the mainstream,” said Josef Skrna, sales and marketing director at Taiyo Europe. “Antioxidant-rich green tea catechins may help reduce the risk of major health problems such as strokes, heart failure, cancer and diabetes.”

Taiyo said the catechins present in green tea and its extracts burn subcutaneous and visceral fat at a rate 1.3 times higher than caffeine, breaking down stored fat into fatty acids that are burned by the body.

“Green tea is also beneficial in helping lower blood glucose levels, regulating the blood sugar ‘swings’ associated with high GI (glycaemic index) foods – and offering natural aid to the 160 million type-2 diabetes sufferers worldwide,” the company said.

“A further 12-week study reports that catechins contained in green tea activate fat metabolism, resulting in ‘significantly lower’ body fat, particularly abdominal fat.”

A recent study published in Nutrition found extracts from green tea may reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and markers of oxidative stress within three weeks.

The study adds to an ever growing body of science reporting the potential health benefits of green tea and its extracts, which already range from reduced risks of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, and certain cancers.

Read more about green tea.


Green Tea Study – May Help Prevent Heart Disease and Stroke

Researchers from the Athens Medical School in Greece and published in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention conducted a study which found drinking green tea may help prevent heart disease and stroke.

“A couple of cups a day would probably be a good dose for people,” researcher Charalambos Vlachopoulos said. “This is the first study to show these effects for green tea.”

Prior research has indicated that black tea can improve cardiovascular health, leading researchers suspect that green tea might even more effective. Many of the beneficial health effects of tea are attributed to its high content of antioxidant polyphenols, especially flavonoids. Most of these polyphenols are destroyed, however, by the fermentation process that makes tea black. This is why green tea has a water-extractable polyphenol content of between 30 and 40 percent, while the content in black tea is only 3 to 10 percent.


In the current study, researchers had 14 volunteers drink three different beverages, on three separate occasions: 6 grams of green tea, 125 milligrams of caffeine (the amount found in 6 grams of green tea) and a cup of hot water. They measured the flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the participants’ blood vessels at 30, 90 and 120 minutes after consumption.

FMD is a widely used measure of blood vessel health.

The participants’ FMD improved by an average of 3.9 percent within 30 minutes of drinking green tea. It did not change at all in those who drank either the caffeine or hot water.

“Green tea is consumed less in the Western world than black tea, but it could be more beneficial because of the way it seems to improve [circulatory] function,” Vlachopoulos said.

He also noted that a number of studies have linked green tea to various cancer-fighting effects.

Find out more about Green Tea HERE